Top 5 and Worst 5 BEVERAGES

Drinking has been a large part of socializing throughout the centuries. In Ancient Greece, a social gathering for the purpose of drinking was known as a symposium, where watered down wine would be drunk. The purpose of these gatherings could be anything from serious discussions to direct indulgence. In Ancient Rome, a similar concept of a convivial took place regularly.

Many early societies considered alcohol a gift from the gods, leading to the creation of gods such as Dionysus. Other religions forbid, discourage, or restrict the drinking of alcoholic beverages for various reasons. In some regions with a dominant religion the production, sale, and consumption of alcoholic beverages is forbidden to everybody, regardless of religion.

Toasting is a method of honoring a person or wishing good will by taking a drink. Another tradition is that of the loving cup, at weddings or other celebrations such as sports victories a group will share a drink in a large receptacle, shared by everyone until empty.

In East Africa and Yemen, coffee was used in native religious ceremonies. As these ceremonies conflicted with the beliefs of the Christian church, the Ethiopian Church banned the secular consumption of coffee until the reign of Emperor Menelik II.The beverage was also banned in Ottoman Turkey during the 17th century for political reasons and was associated with rebellious political activities in Europe.

TOP 5

1. Pilsner Beer
The City of Pilsen began brewing in 1295, but until the mid-1840s, most Bohemian beers were top-fermented. The taste and standards of quality often varied widely, and in 1838, consumers dumped whole barrels to show their dissatisfaction.The officials of Pilsen founded a city-owned brewery in 1839, called Měšťanský pivovar Plzeň , which was to brew beer in the pioneering Bavarian style.Brewers had begun aging beer made with bottom-fermenting yeasts in caves, which improved the beer’s clarity and shelf-life. Part of this research benefited from the knowledge already expounded on in a book (printed in German in 1794, in Czech in 1799), written by Czech brewer František Ondřej Poupě (1753–1805) from Brno.

Pilsner
Pilsner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Coca-Cola
The first bottling of Coca-Cola occurred in Vicksburg, Mississippi, at the Biedenharn Candy Company in 1891. The proprietor of the bottling works was Joseph A. Biedenharn. The original bottles were Biedenharn bottles, very different from the much later hobble-skirt design of 1915 now so familiar.
It was then a few years later that two entrepreneurs from Chattanooga, Tennessee, namely; Benjamin F. Thomas and Joseph B. Whitehead, proposed the idea of bottling and were so persuasive that Candler signed a contract giving them control of the procedure for only one dollar. Candler never collected his dollar, but in 1899, Chattanooga became the site of the first Coca-Cola bottling company. Candler remained very content just selling his company’s syrup.The loosely termed contract proved to be problematic for The Coca-Cola Company for decades to come. Legal matters were not helped by the decision of the bottlers to subcontract to other companies, effectively becoming parent bottlers.

Coca Cola
Coca Cola

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. McDonald’s Milk Shake
A milkshake is a sweet, cold beverage which is usually made from milk, ice cream, or iced milk, and flavorings or sweeteners such as butterscotch, caramel sauce, chocolate sauce, or fruit syrup. Outside the United States, milkshakes using ice cream or iced milk are sometimes called a thick milkshake or thick shake or in New England (outside of Rhode Island) a frappe, to differentiate them from thinner forms of flavored milk.
Full-service restaurants, soda fountains, and diners usually prepare and mix the shake “by hand” from scoops of ice cream and milk in a blender or drink mixer using a stainless steel cup. Many fast food outlets do not make shakes by hand with ice cream. Instead, they make shakes in automatic milkshake machines which freeze and serve a pre-made milkshake mixture consisting of milk, a sweetened flavoring agent, and a thickening agent. However, some fast food outlets still follow the traditional method, and some serve milkshakes which are prepared by blending soft-serve ice cream (or ice milk) with flavoring or syrups.
A milkshake can also be made by adding powder into fresh milk and stirring the powder into the milk. Milkshakes made in this way can come in a variety of flavors, including chocolate, caramel, strawberry, and banana.

Milk Shake
Milk Shake

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Champagne
Champagne is a sparkling wine produced from grapes grown in the Champagne region of France following rules that demand, among other things, secondary fermentation of the wine in the bottle to create carbonation, specific vineyard practices, sourcing of grapes exclusively from specific parcels in the Champagne appellation and specific pressing regimes unique to the region.Some use the term Champagne as a generic term for sparkling wine, but in most countries, it is illegal to officially label any product Champagne unless it both comes from the Champagne region and is produced under the rules of the appellation.
A glass of Champagne exhibiting the characteristic bubbles associated with the wine
The primary grapes used in the production of Champagne are black Pinot noir and Pinot Meunier but also white Chardonnay. Champagne appellation law only allows grapes grown according to appellation rules in specifically designated plots within the appellation to be used in the production of Champagne.
Royalty became associated with Champagne in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. The leading manufacturers made efforts to associate their Champagnes with nobility and royalty through advertising and packaging, which led to popularity among the emerging middle class.

Dom Perignon
Dom Perignon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Red Bull
Red Bull’s slogan was “it gives you wings” until they were hit with a $13 million class action lawsuit in late 2014.It was later changed to “No Red Bull, no wings”. Red Bull’s international marketing campaign targets young men mostly with extreme sports. These range from mountain biking, BMX, motocross, windsurfing, snowboarding, skateboarding, kayaking, rowing, wakeboarding, cliff-diving, surfing, skating, freestyle motocross, rally, Formula 1 racing, to breakdancing. Red Bull uses music and videogames, and has enlisted celebrities, such as Eminem (sponsoring the Red Bull “EmSee Battle Rap championships”).

Red Bull
Red Bull

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WORST 5

1. Mastika
Mastika is a liqueur seasoned with mastic, a resin gathered from the mastic tree, a small evergreen tree native to the Mediterranean region and it is most commonly consumed as an aperitif, usually poured over ice and enjoyed with meze. Containing 43–45% alcohol, it has a hot taste not unlike that of brandy and is usually made from grapes, raisins, plums or figs. In Macedonia, mastika has traditionally been made in the Strumica area; the best known Macedonian brand, Strumička mastika (“Mastika of Strumica”), made by the company Grozd since 1953, contains 43% alcohol and is produced exclusively at export quality.

Mastika
Mastika

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Blue Moon Beer
The grain bill for Blue Moon includes malted barley, white wheat, orange peel, coriander and oats—and is sometimes served with a slice of orange, which its brewmasters claim accentuates the flavor of the brew.Keith Villa admitted the orange slice garnish was mostly for attention-getting when Blue Moon is served in a bar.
Available in cans, bottles and kegs, Blue Moon has 5.4% alcohol by volume.In Oklahoma, Minnesota, Colorado and Utah, the alcohol content of all Blue Moon beers bought in grocery or convenience stores is 3.2% alcohol by weight (approximately 4.0% alcohol by volume). Blue Moon Brews and seasonal brews sold in liquor stores are 5.4% by volume.

Orange Beer
Orange Beer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Corn Beer
Corn beer, beer made from corn, is a traditional beverage in various cuisines. Chicha is widespread in Latin America and some types use corn and are fermented and alcoholic, especially chicha de jora (a type of yellow corn). Chicha is popular in Peru and is served in Arequipa’s picanterías. Tejuino is a corn beer made by the Tarahumara Indians of Sierra Madre in Mexico.
Umqombothi is the Xhosa language word for a corn beer made in South Africa from maize (corn), maize malt, sorghum malt, yeast and water.

Corn Beer
Corn Beer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Rum
Rum is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from sugarcane byproducts, such as molasses, or directly from sugarcane juice, by a process of fermentation and distillation. The distillate, a clear liquid, is then usually aged in oak barrels.
The majority of the world’s rum production occurs in the Caribbean and Latin America. Rum is also produced in Austria, Spain, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Hawaii, the Philippines, India, Reunion Island, Mauritius, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand, Japan, the United States and Canada.
Rums are produced in various grades. Light rums are commonly used in cocktails, whereas “golden” and “dark” rums were typically consumed straight or neat, on the rocks, or used for cooking, but are now commonly consumed with mixers. Premium rums are also available, made to be consumed either straight or iced.
Rum plays a part in the culture of most islands of the West Indies as well as in The Maritimes and Newfoundland. This beverage has famous associations with the Royal Navy (where it was mixed with water or beer to make grog) and piracy (where it was consumed as bumbo). Rum has also served as a popular medium of economic exchange, used to help fund enterprises such as slavery (see Triangular trade), organized crime, and military insurgencies (e.g., the American Revolution and Australia’s Rum Rebellion).

Rum
Rum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Absinthe
Absinthe is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45–74% ABV / 90–148 U.S. proof) beverage.It is an anise-flavored spirit derived from botanical, including the flowers and leaves of Artemisia absinthium (“grand wormwood”), together with green anise, sweet fennel, and other medicinal and culinary herbs.Absinthe traditionally has a natural green color but may also be colorless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as “la fée verte” (the green fairy). Although it is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a liqueur, absinthe is not traditionally bottled with added sugar; it is therefore classified as a spirit.Absinthe is traditionally bottled at a high level of alcohol by volume, but it is normally diluted with water prior to being consumed.

Absinthe
Absinthe

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