Top 5 and Worst 5 SPEAKERS

Johann Philipp Reis installed an electric loudspeaker in his telephone in 1861; it was capable of reproducing clear tones, but also could reproduce muffled speech after a few revisions. Alexander Graham Bell patented his first electric loudspeaker (capable of reproducing intelligible speech) as part of his telephone in 1876, which was followed in 1877 by an improved version from Ernst Siemens. During this time, Thomas Edison was issued a British patent for a system using compressed air as an amplifying mechanism for his early cylinder phonographs, but he ultimately settled for the familiar metal horn driven by a membrane attached to the stylus. In 1898, Horace Short patented a design for a loudspeaker driven by compressed air; he then sold the rights to Charles Parsons, who was issued several additional British patents before 1910. A few companies, including the Victor Talking Machine Company and Pathé, produced record players using compressed-air loudspeakers. However, these designs were significantly limited by their poor sound quality and their inability to reproduce sound at low volume. Variants of the system were used for public address applications, and more recently, other variations have been used to test space-equipment resistance to the very loud sound and vibration levels that the launching of rockets produces.

TOP 5
1. Bowers & Wilkins MM-1
Bowers & Wilkins began as a radio and electronics shop in Worthing. It was started after World War II by John Bowers and Roy Wilkins who had met while serving in the Royal Corps of Signals during the war.The shop expanded to include televisions retail, a rentals business and a service department run by Peter Hayward. When the shop began supplying public address equipment to schools and churches in Sussex, John Bowers became increasingly involved in the design and assembly of loudspeakers, eventually setting up a small production line in workshops behind the shop.

Bowers & Wilkins MM-1
Bowers & Wilkins MM-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. JBL LSR308 3 Series
James B. Lansing founded JBL one year after leaving Altec Lansing as their Vice President of Engineering in 1945. The company was first called Lansing Sound, Inc., from 1 October 1946, and later changed its name to James B. Lansing Sound. The first products were the model D101 15-inch loudspeaker and the model D175 high-frequency driver. The D175 remained in the JBL catalog through the 1970s. Both of these were near-copies of Altec Lansing products. The first original product was the D130, a 15-inch transducer for which a variant would remain in production for the next 55 years. The D130 featured a four-inch flat ribbon wire voice coil and Alnico V magnet. Two other products were the 12-inch D131 and the 8-inch D208 cone drivers.

JBL LSR308 3 Series
JBL LSR308 3 Series

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Bose 601
Bose began extensive research aimed at clarifying factors that he saw as fundamental weaknesses plaguing high-end audio systems. The principal weaknesses, in his view, were that the overall it the electronics and speaker failed to account for the spatial properties of the radiated sound in typical listening spaces (homes and apartments) and the implications of spatiality for psychoacoustics, i.e. the listener’s head as a sonic diffraction object as part of the system. Eight years later, he started the company, charging it with a mission to achieve “Better Sound Through Research”, now the company slogan.

Bose 601
Bose 601

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Infinity Kappa 9
Founded in 1968 by Arnie Nudell, John Ulrick and Cary Christie, Infinity has produced home and mobile audio products by employing innovative materials such as neodymium magnets, mylar diaphragms, and polypropylene cones. The company’s first product was the Servo-Static speaker system which, as the name implies, consisted of electrostatic main panels and a revolutionary servo controlled woofer based on the bomb guidance systems Nudell was developing at the time for defense contractor Litton.
In the late 1970s Infinity introduced the EMIT (electromagnetic induction tweeter) and EMIM (electromagnetic induction midrange) drivers. These were flat quasi-ribbons that worked to move air based on the principle of electromagnetic induction. Variants were made, such as the EMIT-R (radial emit), the S-EMIT (super emit) and the L-EMIM (large emim).

Infinity Kappa 9
Infinity Kappa 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Mission MV8
Mission Electronics was founded in 1977 by Farad Azima and was immediately recognised as one of the leaders in the development of acoustic engineering through its application of new technologies to create some of the most rewarding loudspeakers in every market sector.
Mission quickly became a very popular hi-fi brand and earned an enviable reputation for the design and manufacture of some of the world’s finest and technologically innovative hi-fi products.

Mission MV8
Mission MV8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WORST 5
1. PANASONIC-SB-AFC500 Too much plastic, a lot of ugly noise for a lot of money.
Panasonic Corporation, formerly known as Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., is a Japanese multinational electronics corporation headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka, Japan.
The company was founded in 1918 and has grown to become one of the largest Japanese electronics producers alongside Sony, Hitachi, Toshiba and Canon Inc. In addition to electronics, it offers non-electronic products and services such as home renovation services. Panasonic is the world’s fourth-largest television manufacturer by 2012 market share.

PANASONIC-SB-AFC500
PANASONIC-SB-AFC500

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. KRK Rokit 5 Unfortunately, comparing to KRK 8 and other competitors KRK 5 failed to fulfill the purpose of studio monitors. No bass and very undefined mid and high.
KRK Systems is one of the world’s most respected manufacturers of studio reference monitors. In their state of the art design facility, KRK engineers create products that deliver natural and balanced spectral response with low distortion and superior imaging. KRK Studio Monitors have been the professional’s choice of recording engineers and artists for mixing and mastering hit records around the globe, as they need to hear every nuance of the audio being reproduced.

KRK Rokit 5
KRK Rokit 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Behringer Studio 50USB Pale copy of JBL studio monitors and by the way Behringer is famous as a copycat company.
Inspired by lean manufacturing, and driven by the Kaizen philosophy of continual improvement,Behringer makes efforts to help its employees to improve. “Behringer University” supplies employees with training resources and E-learning courses to hone their career skills within the company. This project includes classes for management, career planning, health, language, and general knowledge.

Studio 50USB
Studio 50USB

 

 

 

 

 

4. Bang & Olufsen Wireless 13BO Someone will say that I am stupid and that Bang & Olufsen rocks, but for 14.000 Euros you could buy much better sound system.
Peter Bang (1900–1957), son of Camillo Bang, a successful Danish businessman, showed great interest in radio technology from an early age. After graduating as an engineer in 1924, he spent six months working in a U.S. radio factory. Upon his return to Denmark, he teamed up with his friend Svend Olufsen (1897–1949), whose parents made the attic of their manor house in Struer in Jutland available for experiments. When they officially opened their business in 1925, Bang concentrated on the technology while Olufsen dealt with business. There were a number of successful developments in the 1930s and 1940s, including a sound recording system for the film industry, roof-mounted loudspeakers for circuses and army vehicles, and the iconic Beolit 39 radio with a Bakelite cabinet.

Bang & Olufsen Wireless 13BO
Bang & Olufsen Wireless 13BO

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Sony HAP-Z1ES Those speakers are producing more noise than music and I believe I have never listened to such ugly speakers as this one.
Sony began in the wake of World War II. In 1946, Masaru Ibuka started an electronics shop in a department store building in Tokyo. The company had $530 in capital and a total of eight employees.In the following year he was joined by his colleague,[clarification needed] Akio Morita, and they founded a company called Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo (Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering Corporation). The company built Japan’s first tape recorder, called the Type-G.In 1958 the company changed its name to “Sony”.

Sony HAP-Z1ES
Sony HAP-Z1ES

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